Posts Tagged ‘developers’

Got some bread? Sow an Appleseed this week

One of the best aspects of working at PICnet is the talented, passionate people it attracts as fellow PICnetters. I’m energized each day by my colleagues and their commitment to improving the public good in meaningful, tangible ways.

Those meaningful and tangible ways often take other forms than just their workaday lives at PICnet. We were excited for Michael Chisari, PICnet Developer, when the project he’s been passionately building in his off-hours scored some free pub on TechCrunch recently.

All the hubbub is about Appleseed, an open source, fully decentralized social networking software suite to rival Facebook and its closed system. Michael’s innovative work on the cutting edge of an emerging movement is inspiring to see and helps to inform the work he does at PICnet while we look to innovate and anticipate the needs of our clients and the nonprofit sector as a whole.

Interested in learning about the open source movement that is seeking to bring about the next wave of social networking? Check out Appleseed‘s site.

Better yet, kick in some cash to help Appleseed meet its fundraising goal this week. Hey! Why not even a whole mess of cash and maybe Justin Timberlake will play YOU in the inevitable Hollywood smash: “The Social Network: The Rise of Appleseed”.

 

Open-source devving it up in Oakland

Non-Profit Software Developer Summit 2009A few weeks ago I previewed Dev Summit here on the blog, extending an invite for you to go west and learn from some of the best of the best.

There are few events where I get such a great opportunity to meet key individuals in the community, and learn as much hands-on information, and this year’s Dev Summit came through once again. The event was held in Oakland, Calif. from Nov. 18-20, attended by non-profit software developers, evangelists, and technology users.

I was fortunate to speak with Nate Aune from Jazkarta and share stories about building successful businesses around open-source software and the non-profit sector.  I  also had a chance to engage in discussions with Michelle Murrain of OpenIssues, who shared her thoughts on the open-source CMS landscape for the non-profit sector. Ron Severdia, a member of the Joomla! leadership team, also spoke to the group about  design principles and the upcoming Joomla 1.6 user interface.

There were so many more great folks there that I want to give shout outs to, but there is so little time to say thanks to all of them! Aside from hearing from some of these great people, I spoke on a number of key topics, including open-source CMSs, utilizing cloud services, the Joomla! project, and open-source business models that could support our sector. I was most impressed by the terrific feedback and engagement in the open-source business models session, where participants helped share lessons learned and best practices in achieving success while also building sound business models.

You can visit the event wiki to see all the great notes taken during the sessions.

 

Where in the world is Ryan? … Brazil

Conference dates: September 12; 14 Where: Joomla!Day Brazil; DevinRio

In September, I had the great opportunity to attend two different conferences in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and once again, both were amazing experiences. First up, I went to Joomla!Day Brazil to meet up with Joomla! enthusiasts from a wide range of backgrounds, businesses, the government and nonprofits. I was especially excited to meet Paulino Michelazzo, the president of Fabrica Livre, an open source consulting firm in Sao Paulo.

Similar to what I said in my keynote speech for Joomla!Day South Africa, I gave an update to conference attendees on Joomla! leadership and the drive toward increased transparency in open source matters, and I shared lessons learned from outside the Brazilian community. And then I had the opportunity to learn from the experiences of NGOs in Brazil and how they use Joomla! It’s pretty cool to hear about all the various ways that this software is being utilized around the world.

A couple of days later, I attended DevinRio, a conference specifically for developers with a focus on open-source software. Among the people I had the chance to meet were Guilherme Chapiewski of Globo.com, a large media conglomerate; and my buddy Rodrigo Spillere, the young developer I met earlier this year at FISL 10. At this conference, I shared lessons learned from building an open-source community around an open-source project, while keeping in mind the user and community experience when writing code – because usability and constituent feedback are key to providing the best experience possible.

Dev in Rio 2009 – Ryan Ozimek e Coding Dojo from Guilherme Chapiewski on Vimeo.

In a nutshell, I was able to explain, as one attendee said, “the secret sauce of the Joomla! community success and show how open-source projects are improving the landscape of technology and helping to change the world.”